Apr 282012
 

The guest post below describes three different types of bathtubs you might want to consider putting in your bathroom to create an elegantly and visually appealing room.

Freestanding: As the name implies, this is the type of tub that stands alone in the bathroom with no attachment to the walls for support. This frees up space which can make your bathroom look more spacious.

Roll-top: These are freestanding tubs, typically with claw feet and made of cast iron with a top that curves or “rolls.” This makes for a very comfortable place to rest your hands when soaking in this type tub.

Slipper: This is a type of freestanding tub in which one side is taller than the other, thus resembling a slipper. This elegant soaking tub gives your back much needed support as you sit in the tub.

 

Maybe you’ve just moved into a new house, or you simply wish to revamp your old bathroom. For the perfect relaxing bathroom suite you need a bathtub to soak in. But what style/type of bathtub do you need?

Although you may not have given it much thought, the style and design of a bathtub is very important, as it acts as a “centerpiece” to the room. It’s one of the many things people notice once they walk into a bathroom, and wouldn’t it be lovely if a person walked into your bathroom, saw how lovely and relaxing your bathtub looked, and commented on its attractiveness? Not that it’s normal to comment on how “attractive” a bathtub is, but if you pick the perfect style, you could have one rather handsome looking bathtub, that all the ladies and gentlemen are envious of.

So, what styles of bathtub are there?

Let’s start off with freestanding bathtubs. Depending on how big your bathroom is, a freestanding bathtub could be perfect. Different from built-in bathtubs, a freestanding bathtub can be shaped in various ways. You could have one that is round, and very bowl-like. This breaks the conventional style of a bathtub, perfect for adding a modern twist to a classic bathroom. You could opt for a freestanding bathtub that is rectangle, and add more of a clean-cut, modern appearance to your bathroom.

Roll top baths are the classic type of Victorian bathtub and are generally free-standing tubs held up from the floor by feet. These free standing baths give your bathroom a very elegant and classic feel. They can give the whole room an air of luxury, and a person may feel like a Victorian King or Queen whilst relaxing within one of these tubs. The feet on this style of tubs are one of the most eye-catching features, with many different styles of these feet being available. From the classic clawed feet style, to one that is more minimalistic and “block-like”. Instead of feet, a person could also choose a pedestal roll top bath tub, which has more of an art deco feel.

Another style of bathtub which echoes class and luxury, is a slipper tub. These bathtubs have one side which is slightly elongated, giving you more of a support to lay your back against. This style is perfect for someone who chooses to bathe for relaxation purposes.

When choosing the ideal bathtub for your bathroom, try to imagine how it would look filled with hot water and lots of bubbles. If you visualize it to look tempting enough to jump straight into fully clothed, then that gives you an inkling that it’s possibly the style of bath you wish to have in your home. If you choose a bathtub that is not built-in, make sure that your bathroom floor is strong enough to withhold the weight, as freestanding bathtubs can be extremely heavy.

Written by Stephanie Staszko on behalf of Branded Bathrooms freestanding baths. http://www.brandedbathrooms.com/baths/free-standing-baths/
This post was originally published on Southgate Chamber and can be found here: http://www.southgatechamber.com/choosing-the-ideal-tub-for-your-bathroom.html

Another type of bathtub you may want to consider is a walk-in bathtub.

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